More landscape subjugation (in Indianapolis) courtesy of the Veterans Administration

Crown Hill cemetery is located near White River in Indianapolis.  It has sold 15 acres of pre-settlement forest to the Department of Veterans Affairs.  Just as the people of the Heart of the River coalition have devoted and expended a lot of heart into the defense of the river from the planned dam in Anderson, the folks of the Alliance of Crown Hill Neighbors have lent heart to their fight to preserve the forest.  More info at indianaforestalliance.org and savethecrownhillwoods.com.

I was recently reading Scott Russell Sanders’ 2016 novel Divine Animal.  He poignantly describes our “subjugated landscape” in Indiana as follows.

“… he looked over the fields on either side of the highway…  The terrain was flat here, leveled by glaciers as far as he could see it was planted in corn and soybeans… It was a subjugated landscape. He knew that almost every acre within sight had been covered with hardwood forest when the first white settlers arrived, yet now the only scraps of forest remaining were spindly woodlots here and there.  Across Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, there were millions of such acres once covered with great trees, nearly all of them cleared in a few decades with hand tools and muscle power.  And cleared not only of trees.  Passenger pigeons, Carolina parakeets, wolves, bison, bears panthers, and lynx were all driven from this part of the country or driven to extinction, along with the Shawnee, Miami, Piankeshaw, and other native tribes. Once we had exploited the continent from sea to sea, we began sending our soldiers anywhere on Earth that possessed something we wanted.  This bullying was an old habit, ingrained in us over three centuries, since the Pilgrims arrived in the New World with their muskets and their writ of ownership from God and king.

How could he explain this view of his nation, which he had arrived at slowly, reluctantly, through reading and reflection, and which ran so contrary to what he’s been taught in school, where the subduing of land, Indians, and beasts had been portrayed as the triumph of civilization over wilderness, where every U.S. venture had been justified as a crusade by the powers of light against the powers of darkness.

Scott Russell Sanders, Divine Animal, 2016

 

 

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